Katie Ray-Jones: Confronting Tech-Enabled Domestic Violence (Ep. 147)

Katie Ray-Jones: Confronting Tech-Enabled Domestic Violence (Ep. 147)

Bio

Katie Ray-Jones (@KtRayJones) is President of the National Domestic Violence Hotline and National Dating Abuse Hotline. Previously, she served as NDCH’s Director of Operations.

As a member of the National Task Force to Reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act and in her role as Hotline Director, Katie has made several visits to key congressional offices and is well known on Capitol Hill as a representative of the Hotline and Helpline.  Katie has distinguished herself as a leader with prominent individuals in the national domestic violence movement and with national domestic violent groups and has represented the Hotline at several key national domestic/dating violence and gender-based violence meetings.

Katie also has extensive experience working with survivors of domestic violence.  She has managed an emergency shelter, transitional and permanent housing programs, nonresidential services for survivors and their children, 24-hour hotlines, services for individuals with HIV/AIDS, housing for families who are homeless, case management programs for children who have been abused and neglected, and a therapeutic preschool for children who have witnessed violence.  She has also worked at a legal clinic that provided assistance to victims of domestic violence who were seeking restraining orders and other types of legal advocacy, provided individual therapy and facilitated groups for survivors and abusers and worked for the Texas Health and Human Services Commission administering funding to family violence providers throughout the state of Texas.

Katie has a bachelor’s degree in child and family development from San Diego State University and a master’s degree in Nonprofit Management and Leadership from the University of San Diego.  Katie is married and has two wonderful children, George and Maximillian.

Resources

The National Domestic Violence Hotline

Daring Greatly: How the Courage to Be Vulnerable Transforms the Way We Live, Love, Parent, and Lead by Briné Brown.

News Roundup

EU fines Google $5 billion

The European Union fined Google parent Alphabet some $5 billion for allegedly using its Android operating system to direct users to Google search. Android runs on some 80% of the world’s smartphones according to the Wall Street Journal. Still, Alphabet’s second quarter earnings beat analysts’ expectations by more than $2 per share. And in after-hours trading, Google shares rose 3.9% to $1,267.

FCC Punts on Sinclair

The FCC unanimously voted to send Sinclair’s proposed $3.9 billion acquisition of Tribine Media to an Administrative Law judge. The FCC found that Sinclair failed to disclose that it planned to divest Chicago’s WGN to Baltimore businessman Steven Fader, who has no broadcast experience, and who is a friend of Sinclair Executive Chairman David Smith. The FCC found the divestiture, priced at $60 million, would have been far below market value, and Sinclair would have maintained control of the station. Sinclair has since revised its plan. It now proposes to keep control of WGN, but divest stations in Houston and Dallas. Still, experts don’t expect the ALJ to approve the merger.

Justice Department releases cybercrime/election meddling plan

The Justice Department released a response plan for how it will handle election hacking and cybercrime. The report also discusses how the agency will address denial of service attacks, use existing law, such as the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, to prosecute, and the surveillance tactics it will implement. It also discusses how the DOJ will train agents and lists the challenges the government faces.

Twitter suspended 58 million accounts in the fourth quarter

Twitter suspended some 58 million of its user accounts in the Fourth Quarter of 2017, according to the Associated Press. Last week, the company had reported that it had suspended somewhere between 50 and 70 million users in response to Russian interference with the 2016 presidential election.

Comcast drops bid for 21st Century Fox

Comcast dropped its bid for 21st Century Fox, which Disney is likely to acquire for $71 billion in cash and stock. Disney and Comcast had been in a bidding war over Fox’s assets. CNBC reporter David Faber reported that Comcast’s withdrawal of its bid was, at least to some extent, provoked by the fact that the U.S. government will be appealing to the DC Circuit to reverse the court-approved merger of AT&T and Time Warner.

Netflix misses on subscriber growth

Netflix reported a huge miss on subscriber additions in the second quarter—they added 1 million fewer than forecast for 5.15 million subscribers. Additions of domestic subscribers fared worse than the rate of additions internationally, meeting just over half of the projected amount, or 674,000 versus the 1.23 million that analysts forecast. Earnings, though, were barely shy of expectations with $3.91 billion in revenue versus the $3.94 billion that was projected.

Congress will allow Trump’s plan to save ZTE

Congress declined to block last week the Trump administration’s plan to save Chinese device manufacturer ZTE from tough sanctions that prevented ZTE and Huawei from taking on government contracts. The sanctions were expected to all but put ZTE out of business. But the Trump administration decided to pull back on the sanctions it had initially planned. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said the failure of Congress to keep the sanctions in place was a win for Chinese President Xi Jinping and a loss for American workers and national security.