Law Enforcement Podcast Archives

Chelsea Barabas: How to balance AI and criminal justice (Ep. 136)

How to balance AI and criminal justice (Ep. 136)

Chelsea Barabas (@chels_bar) is a research scientist at MIT, where she examines the spread of algorithmic decision making tools in the US criminal justice system.

Formerly, Chelsea was the Head of Social Innovation with the MIT Media Lab’s Digital Currency Initiative. She has worked on a wide range of issues related to the use of emerging technologies to serve the public good around the world.

Riana Pfefferkorn: The Emerging Trend of ‘Side-Channel Cryptanalysis’ (Ep. 133)

Riana Pfefferkorn: The Emerging Trend of ‘Side-Channel Cryptanalysis’ (Ep. 133)

Riana Pfefferkorn (@Riana_Crypto) is the Cryptography Fellow at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society. Her work, made possible through funding from the Stanford Cyber Initiative, focuses on investigating and analyzing the U.S. government’s policy and practices for forcing decryption and/or influencing crypto-related design of online platforms and services, devices, and products, both via technical means and through the courts and legislatures. Riana also researches the benefits and detriments of strong encryption on free expression, political engagement, economic development, and other public interests.

Desmond Patton: Understanding Social Media and Gang Violence (Ep. 127)

Desmond Patton: Understanding Social Media and Gang Violence (Ep. 127)

Dr. Desmond Upton Patton (@SAFELab) is an assistant professor at the Columbia School of Social Work and a Faculty Affiliate of the Social Intervention Group (SIG) and the Data Science Institute. His research utilizes qualitative and computational data collection methods to examine how and why youth and gang violence, trauma, grief and identity are expressed on social media and the real world impact they have on well-being for low-income youth of color.

Simone Browne: Surveillance in Color (Ep. 125)

Simone Browne: Surveillance in Color (Ep. 125)

Dr. Simone Browne (@wewatchwatchers) is Associate Professor in the Department of African and African Diaspora Studies at the University of Texas, Austin. She teaches and researches surveillance studies and black diaspora studies.

Emma Llansó: How to Stop Enabling Sex Trafficking (Ep. 116)

How to Stop Enabling Sex Trafficking (Ep. 116)

Emma Llansó (@ellanso) is the Director of CDT’s Free Expression Project, which works to promote law and policy that support users’ free expression rights in the United States and around the world. Emma leads CDT’s work in advancing speech-protective policies, which include legislative advocacy and amicus activity in the U.S. aimed at ensuring that online expression receives the highest level of protection under the First Amendment. Recognizing the crucial role played by Internet intermediaries in facilitating individuals’ expression, she works to preserve strong intermediary liability protections in the U.S. and to advance these key policies abroad.

Danielle Citron: How to Fight for Cyberstalking Victims (Ep. 115)

Danielle Citron: How to Fight for Cyberstalking Victims (Ep. 115)

Danielle Keats Citron (@daniellecitron) is the Morton & Sophia Macht Professor of Law at the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law where she teaches and writes about information privacy, free expression, and civil rights and was the recipient of the 2005 “Teacher of the Year” award. Professor Citron is an internationally recognized information privacy expert. Her book Hate Crimes in Cyberspace (Harvard University Press 2014) explored the phenomenon of cyber stalking and how law and companies can and should tackle online abuse consistent with our commitment to free speech. The editors of Cosmopolitan included her book in “20 Best Moments for Women in 2014.”

George Joseph: Iris Recognition Technology and the U.S. Border Patrol (Ep. 108)

George Joseph: Iris Recognition Technology and the U.S. Border Patrol (Ep. 108)

George Joseph (@GeorgeJoseph94) is a reporting fellow at Demos focusing on surveillance, immigration, law enforcement, and the entry of big data in criminal justice systems. His work has appeared in outlets such as The Guardian, NPR, The Atlantic, The Nation, The Verge, Slate, and CityLab.

How Much Privacy Should You Expect in the Digital Age? with Bernard Chao (Ep. 93)

How Much Privacy Should You Expect in the Digital Age? with Bernard Chao (Ep. 93)

The digital age is challenging the way our judicial system balances privacy against the needs of law enforcement. The Fourth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution states: “The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated.” Our devices, as well as cloud-based services like Dropbox, have revolutionized our concept of what information should be considered private. For example, in U.S. v. Graham, the

Ep 89: How the Police are Escalating their Use of Social Media for Surveillance with Matt Cagle

Ep 89: How the Police are Escalating their Use of Social Media for Surveillance with Matt Cagle

Matt Cagle (@Matt_Cagle) is a Policy Attorney for Technology and Civil Liberties at the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU). Matt attended law school at Stanford and has a BA in Latin American Studies and Political Science from the University of Arizona. Before joining the ACLU as a Policy Attorney, Matt worked as an associate with BlurryEdge Strategies, a San Francisco-based law practice advising startups on privacy issues. In this episode, we discussed: how the police

Ep 83: How Trump’s Surveillance of Muslims Affects the Rights of Innocent Civilians with Faiza Patel

Ep 83: How Trump’s Surveillance of Muslims Affects the Rights of Innocent Civilians with Faiza Patel

Faiza Patel (@FaizaPatelBCJ) serves as co-director of the Brennan Center’s Liberty and National Security Program. She has testified before Congress opposing the dragnet surveillance of Muslims, organized advocacy efforts against state laws designed to incite fear of Islam, and developed legislation creating an independent Inspector General for the NYPD. Ms. Patel is the author of five reports: Rethinking Radicalization (2011); A Proposal for an NYPD Inspector General (2012); Foreign Law